View unanswered posts | View active topics It is currently September 22nd, 2014, 12:11 pm



Reply to topic  [ 985 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 62, 63, 64, 65, 66  Next
 Psychedelic Equals Avant-garde 
Author Message
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"Reality began to come back into focus at around eleven o' clock. Larkin came into the room below the loft and began to play music on his guitar. Every chord produced colors and rainbows. Even more interestingly, certain chords produced chemical structures in front of my eyes. I remember distinctly seeing a cyclohexane attached to a histidine floating upward into the ceiling. And this compound was not hazy, it was there. I saw it clear as day. It was beautiful. Larkin then brought his iPod into Andy's loft and put on an album for us all to listen to. Reality continued to come back into focus, but the music produced really vivid images, none of which were as profound as what I had previously experienced, however."

Trip report from someone on Mushrooms.

Source: http://www.erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=88115


November 30th, 2011, 7:26 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
Was there a specific moment when it became clear to you that people were looking at the Beatles as a way of making sense of their lives?

As we began having hits in England, the press were catching on to how we looked, which was changing the image of youth, I suppose. It just gathered momentum. For me, 1966 was the time when the whole world opened up and had a greater meaning. But that was a direct result of LSD.

How did taking LSD affect you?

It was like opening the door, really, and before, you didn't even know there was a door there. It just opened up this whole other consciousness, even if it was down to, like Aldous Huxley said, the wonderful folds in his gray flannel trousers. From that smaller concept to the fact that every blade of grass and every grain of sand is just throbbing and pulsating.

Did it make you feel that your life could be very different from what it was?

Yeah, but that too presented a problem as well, because then the feeling began in me of it's all well and good being popular and being in demand, but, you know, it's ridiculous, really. From then on, I didn't enjoy fame. That's when the novelty disappeared -- around 1966 -- and then it became hard work.

Was it at that point that your identity as one of the Beatles began to get oppressive for you?

Yeah, absolutely. Again, with the realization that came about after the lysergic. It has a humbling power, that stuff. And the ego -- to be able to deal with these people thinking you were some wonderful thing -- it was difficult to come to terms with. I was feeling like nothing.

Did your interest in transcendental meditation and other spiritual disciplines help you?

All the panic and the pressure? Yeah! Absolutely, I think. Although up until LSD, I never realized that there was anything beyond this state of consciousness. But all the pressure was such that, like the man said, "There must be some way out of here." For me, it was definitely LSD. The first time I took it, it just blew everything away. I had such an overwhelming feeling of well-being, that there was a God, and I could see him in every blade of grass. It was like gaining hundreds of years of experience within twelve hours. It changed me, and there was no way back to what I was before.

George Harrison

Taken from Anthony DeCurtis' book, In Other Words.


December 1st, 2011, 2:04 am
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 18th, 2009, 8:21 pm
Posts: 71
Post Re: Psychedelic Equals Avant-garde
Quote:
"I have experimented with LSD, but I also look to friends that I know... I was friends with John Lilly, I don't know if you know who that man is?"

Jeff Bridges.


he;s not an actor, that;s for me


December 11th, 2011, 7:03 pm
Profile
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
Why is the computer field dominated by people so young? The average age of Apple employees is 29.

It’s often the same with any new, revolutionary thing. People get stuck as they get older. Our minds are sort of electrochemical computers. Your thoughts construct patterns like scaffolding in your mind. You are really etching chemical patterns. In most cases, people get stuck in those patterns, just like grooves in a record, and they never get out of them. It’s a rare person who etches grooves that are other than a specific way of looking at things, a specific way of questioning things. It’s rare that you see an artist in his 30s or 40s able to really contribute something amazing. Of course, there are some people who are innately curious, forever little kids in their awe of life, but they’re rare.

Steve Jobs

Source: http://www.txtpost.com/playboy-interview-steven-jobs/


December 13th, 2011, 12:21 am
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"We were only sober for just a couple of hours a day in Korn. Every day."

Brian "Head" Welch

Source: http://www.lvrj.com/neon/55668777.html


December 20th, 2011, 10:55 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
1993. Richard D. James is quite partial to artificially-induced ‘altered states’, too. He smokes a lot of dope, which must make staying awake more challenging, but also explains the marvellous intricacy of his bass-and-percussion patterns.

"I'm always stoned. I like it cos it's like turning a switch in your head. I like to make stuff in all kinds of different states. I like listening to music tripping, cos it's the only way I can get out of that musician mentality where you're thinking about how it's constructed, what equipment they're using. You just feel like a sad bastard when you do that, and the only way to turn that off and to stop taking it apart is to be totally off your head."

Source: http://thequietus.com/articles/04483-si ... -1993-warp


March 16th, 2012, 8:34 am
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
You're also an accomplished bassist and guitarist; can you tell us about your musical background? How did you get into electronic music?

I've just always been into hunting out oddball sounds of any stripe; especially if psychedelic drugs have been involved in their creation (would recommend this to any young person seeking to educate themselves in good sounds).

Barry Lynn (Boxcutter, The Host, etc.), 2012.

Source: http://www.electronicbeats.net/node/11233


March 28th, 2012, 6:31 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"The problem is that the thought-function that you investigate is the same instrument you use for investigation."

Albert Hoffman

Source: http://www.erowid.org/culture/character ... iew1.shtml


April 19th, 2012, 4:43 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
Has LSD affected your philosophical outlook?

From my LSD experiments, including the very first terrifying one, I have received knowledge of not only one, but of an infinite number of realities. Depending upon the condition of our senses and psychic receptors we experience a different reality. I realized that the depth and richness of the inner and outer universe are immeasurable and inexhaustible, but that we have to return from these strange worlds to our homeland and live here in the reality that is provided by our normal, healthy senses. It's like astronauts returning from outer space flights: they must readjust to this planet.

Albert Hoffman

Source: http://www.erowid.org/culture/character ... iew1.shtml


April 19th, 2012, 4:50 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
Your music is hard to put in any musical boxes, because it has so many different styles mixed with each other. In my opinion you belong in the progressive/experimental part of the music world. Do you agree with that? And what are your opinions on that genre, and genres in general?

DAVID KERMAN : Well, it’s commonly known that I hold the dubious honor of being the single most outspoken “Prog” musician AGAINST the notion of modern Progressive Rock. I believe Progressive Rock died as an art-form decades ago, and never became rejuvenated, nor replenished with any of the ground-breaking ethos that once made it interesting and unique. To my admittedly bias ears, today’s Prog bands almost universally choose to emulate their heroes, rather than further the musical terrain those people charted. And because nowadays most musicians cannot make a decent living playing this style of music, their day jobs will keep them in amateur status indefinitely in terms of instrumental technique. It’s a vicious cycle, and I look forward to the day the music dies. Sorry, but that’s the truth. We need to move on, really, in order to “progress”. But, as my own influences were from the original school of Progressive Rock (Henry Cow, Faust, Gentle Giant, National Health etc.), and because it would be fool-hearted of me to deny that I myself could not really break SO far out of the mold which greatly influenced me, I would have to confess that yes, the stigma of Progressive Rock or Experimental- Instrumental might best suit any legacy I might ever be offered.

What's your best advice for young aspiring musicians, who want to make it in the progressive music world or any world for that matter?

DAVID KERMAN : I’m compelled to have this answer follow-up on your former question; I would merely suggest, mildly, that they be open-minded to other styles and forms of music, as opposed to becoming an “expert” in everything that falls under one banner. In my book, the original Progressive Rock bands from the 60’s and 70’s were innovative because their music began as a veritable hybrid of popular styles: Psychedelic, Jazz, Folk, Skiffle, Surf, Classical, Country Western etc. etc. These styles, and more, were mixed and mashed until an astounding degree of both empirical perspicacity and instrumental virtuosity were simultaneously achieved. But today’s Prog bands seem to cull ideas only from their favorites of the so-called “Golden” era of Progressive Rock, which is neither a progressive vocation, nor a way to better their music. Keeping an open set of ears might both offset the temptation to pay homage, and put something musically worthwhile into motion. You know, Prog is dead, long live prog, and all that stuff.

Source: http://www.generalrubric.com/dkerman/main.html


May 10th, 2012, 8:51 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"In later life, Arthur Rimbaud was an anarchist, businessman, arms dealer, financier, and explorer. But as a teenager, all he wanted to be was a poet. In May 1871, the sixteen-year-old Rimbaud wrote two letters, one to Georges Izambard, his former teacher, and one to Paul Demeny, a publisher he was keen to impress.

Rimbaud waited around for Izambard every day, palely loitering outside the school gates, eager to show the young professor his most recent verse. He also peppered Demeny with copies of his work, accompanied by notes in which he effused about his poems and dropped heavy hints that he would not be at all averse to seeing them in print.

In these two missives, known together as the Seer Letters, Rimbaud outlined his vision for a new kind of poetry. "A Poet makes himself a visionary," he lectured Demeny, "through a long, boundless, and systematized disorganization of all the senses." Only that, Rimbaud argued, could create a language that "will include everything; perfumes, sounds, colors, thought grappling with thought."

Rimbaud's poetic program involved upsetting conventional orders of perception, deranging habitual ways of seeing, hearing, smelling, touching, and tasting, and rearranging them in novel combinations. Fresh, vivid, sometimes shocking images resulted when sense impression jostled sense impression, when thought grappled with thought.

"I got used to elementary hallucination," Rimbaud wrote in A Season in Hell. "I could very precisely see a mosque instead of a factory, a drum corps of angels, horse carts on the highway of the sky, a drawing room at the bottom of a lake."

To achieve this systematized disorder, Rimbaud believed the poet needed to see similarity in difference and difference in similarity. Things are never just things in themselves; a visionary company of associations, correspondences, semblances always attends them. Everything can be seen - and, for Rimbaud, everything should be seen - as something else.

Rimbaud summarized his poetic mission, and his working method, in the phrase:

I is an other."

Taken from James Geary, I is an Other: The Secret Life of Metaphor and How It Shapes the Way We See the World, Harper, 2011.


May 14th, 2012, 7:05 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"I had made it to my car after having spent 20 or so minutes unlocking the secrets of the universe on the way down. I popped in the new Radiohead album and let Thom Yorke's lyrics crash over me as I watched from my driver seat. My car was parked in the perfect spot, right on the side of a busy side road perched right on the Eastern side of this massive lake, covered on two sides by looming pine tree's. It was beautiful. Nature on mushrooms is just amazing, words can not describe it. The colors were breathtaking, overblown but beautiful. Think of an HDTV, with that beautiful and crisp color/picture and multiply it by 100 and that was how I was seeing. Except the colors seemed alien. Shades and hues of every color under the sun were popping out at me and I just sat and marveled at how amazing everything looked.

I honed in on the music for a second and let it wash over me. The rythm slowly brought me up to a climax, with every nerve on my body just on fire from pleasure, and the pleasure just kept rising until it peaked, and my entire body convulsed from pleasure. Think of it as the best orgasm you have ever had but spread throughout every square inch of your body and without the messy clean up. I am not exagerating when I say that it was the greatest feeling of my life. I listened to the music for a little over an hour, climaxing every 4 minutes or so, before I made my way back up to the Condo."

Trip report by someone on Mushrooms.

Source: http://www.erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=67280


May 14th, 2012, 7:16 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"There was another and still more important reason for my late awakening. In my boyhood I suffered from a peculiar affliction due to the appearance of images, often accompanied by strong flashes of light, which marred the sight of real objects and interfered with my thought and action. They were pictures of things and scenes which I had really seen, never of those I imagined. When a word was spoken to me the image of the object it designated would present itself vividly to my vision and sometimes I was quite unable to distinguish whether what I saw was tangible or not. This caused me great discomfort and anxiety. None of the students of psychology or physiology whom I have consulted could ever explain satisfactorily these phenomena. They seem to have been unique altho I was probably predisposed as I know that my brother experienced a similar trouble. The theory I have formulated is that the images were the result of a reflex action from the brain on the retina under great excitation. They certainly were not hallucinations such as are produced in diseased and anguished minds, for in other respects I was normal and composed. To give an idea of my distress, suppose that I had witnest a funeral or some such nerve-racking spectacle. Then, inevitably, in the stillness of night, a vivid picture of the scene would thrust itself before my eyes and persist despite all my efforts to banish it. Sometimes it would even remain fixt in space tho I pushed my hand thru it. If my explanation is correct, it should be able to project on a screen the image of any object one conceives and make it visible. Such an advance would revolutionize all human relations. I am convinced that this wonder can and will be accomplished in time to come; I may add that I have devoted much thought to the solution of the problem.

To free myself of these tormenting appearances, I tried to concentrate my mind on something else I had seen, and in this way I would of ten obtain temporary relief; but in order to get it I had to conjure continuously new images. It was not long before I found that I had exhausted all of those at my command; my "reel" had run out, as it were, because I had seen little of the world—only objects in my home and the immediate surroundings. As I performed these mental operations for the second or third time, in order to chase the appearances from my vision, the remedy gradually lost all its force. Then I instinctively commenced to make excursions beyond the limits of the small world of which I had knowledge, and I saw new scenes. These were at first very blurred and indistinct, and would flit away when I tried to concentrate my attention upon them, but by and by I succeeded in fixing them; they gained in strength and distinctness and finally assumed the concreteness of real things. I soon discovered that my best comfort was attained if I simply went on in my vision farther and farther, getting new impressions all the time, and so I began to travel—of course, in my mind. Every night (and sometimes during the day), when alone, I would start on my journeys—see new places, cities and countries—live there, meet people and make friendships and acquaintances and, however unbelievable, it is a fact that they were just as dear to me as those in actual life and not a bit less intense in their manifestations."

Taken from Nikola Tesla, My Inventions, 1919.


May 14th, 2012, 7:41 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"I don’t remember any exterior sounds only a very knowing detachment from myself happening coming on stronger and stronger. The auditory, even though the room was silent, became unbelievably intense. I was sitting in a chair with a leather jacket on and my slight movements produced shocking sounds of movement of the leather illuminating through my audible senses. I couldn’t believe that much sound was possible to be reverberating in my skull. It was scary but not uncomfortable. I kept reminding myself, it’s ok, everything’s going to be fine, but nothing could have prepared me for this."

Trip report from someone on DMT.

Source: http://www.erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=93105


May 15th, 2012, 10:44 pm
Profile WWW
User avatar

Joined: July 4th, 2007, 10:45 pm
Posts: 2511
Post 
"Adrian held a jet lighter flame under the glass bulb, the powder inside (we estimated around 35mg) melted and produced a thick white smoke. “now, now!” Adrian said in an urgent tone, so I hit the pipe in the usual fashion that I would hit a bong. About half way through my first drag, I heard a noise that is slightly difficult to explain. It was less like the often mentioned “tearing of cellophane”, and more like a deep resonating. If you have ever whistled and hummed at the same time at the correct pitch, you will notice that the sound resonates. To me, it was as if a jet engine were resonating next to my ear, while constantly changing pitch up and down. I held my hit, and breathed out. “Hit it again man” said Adrian. I was too terrified by the sound that was assaulting me to contemplate doing this, and managed to utter something along the lines of “no way dude”. Within 3 seconds or so, every object in my field of vision began to explosively exude fractal like patterns, that organically shifted and morphed outwards from every objects centre."

Trip report from someone on DMT.

Source: http://www.erowid.org/experiences/exp.php?ID=70877


May 15th, 2012, 10:46 pm
Profile WWW
Display posts from previous:  Sort by  
Reply to topic   [ 985 posts ]  Go to page Previous  1 ... 62, 63, 64, 65, 66  Next

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest


You cannot post new topics in this forum
You cannot reply to topics in this forum
You cannot edit your posts in this forum
You cannot delete your posts in this forum
You cannot post attachments in this forum

Search for:
Jump to:  
cron
Powered by phpBB © 2000, 2002, 2005, 2007 phpBB Group.
Designed by STSoftware.