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 Fashion 
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Interesting choice of words for the French translation of Angst.


November 26th, 2010, 9:07 am
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And the non-Spanish translation. :P Do you not have many Spanish fans, mr. Tentakel?

The longsleeve design seems very cool in its pixelatedlity!

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November 26th, 2010, 9:44 am
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Well, I do not know about our spanish fans actually, are there? When we choose the languages we wanted to spread around the globe, not stick to too many romance (obvious choice for an european trying to find foreign language meanings for a word) languages. Yees, I know there are two germanics in there... :P

@David: As I understand it, "angoisse" is not the pure, instinctive fear; more something like an anxiety. You might want to check the next (january) edition of the Legacy-Printzine where we talked about just that modern anxiety...

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November 26th, 2010, 2:24 pm
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Tentakel P. wrote:
Well, I do not know about our spanish fans actually, are there? When we choose the languages we wanted to spread around the globe, not stick to too many romance (obvious choice for an european trying to find foreign language meanings for a word) languages. Yees, I know there are two germanics in there... :P


Understand the point, though it's not a rant of mine, eh. But 'Miedo' is quite different from all those words while 'Angoisse' is more like 'Angst', so it would have looked better. :mrgreen:

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November 26th, 2010, 2:52 pm
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I cannot think of anything better than wearing an AGM shirt while doing my interviews around Europe... Chrystof: please? :D
In the meantime I will defineitely make my own: my top model kitty is willing to pose for a realistic (albiet artistic!) shot hahaha :wink:

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November 26th, 2010, 6:55 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
Fashion for me is just black t-shirts and black blue jeans, ha made a funny! I love that shirt that says FUCK FASHION. But it cost 30 dollars. Ha !.... I want to experiment one day with the James Bond look, when I get way older. Now I am a 44 year old rager. And I love the old 1980's way of the heavy metal uniform, that I like (I seen this look on the 1st Testament alubm, and it ruled). Before that I went with combat camouflage fatigues, because Paul Baloff wore them, and Scott Ian did also on the Armed and Dangerous mini-album.

I do love that different music artist use fashion to accentuate the music, ala, dressing different because your in store for something different musically

Even though I worship Gothic/ Symphonic / Black Metal to the maximum, I never brought that fashion into my fashion sensibilities. I love year after year picture of me dressed the same, and I like to guess. What era the picture was taken in. Based on how other people were dress, and what trends where going on with them at the time the picture was taken.


October 30th, 2011, 3:01 am
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Post Re: Fashion
KVLT FASHION
http://www.urbanoutfitters.com/urban/ca ... d=20914651

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April 29th, 2012, 11:25 am
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Hurra for hipster black metal fashion. :)


April 29th, 2012, 12:57 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
Fashion creates the army of clones and zombies. It's style that makes you look individual


November 21st, 2013, 9:04 am
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Post Re: Fashion
Influences

St. Augustine of Hippo / Recent scholarship has shown that Heidegger was substantially influenced by St. Augustine of Hippo and that Being and Time would not have been possible without the influence of Augustine's thought. Augustine viewed time as relative and subjective, and that being and time were bound up together. Heidegger adopted similar views, e.g. that time was the horizon of Being: ' ...time temporalizes itself only as long as there are human beings.'

Aristotle and the Greeks / ...mediated through Catholic theology, medieval philosophy and Franz Brentano
(best known for his reintroduction of the concept of intentionality — a concept derived from scholastic philosophy — to contemporary philosophy in his lectures and in his work Psychologie vom Empirischen Standpunkt (Psychology from an Empirical Standpoint). While often simplistically summarised as "aboutness" or the relationship between mental acts and the external world, Brentano defined it as the main characteristic of mental phenomena, by which they could be distinguished from physical phenomena. Every mental phenomenon, every psychological act has content, is directed at an object (the intentional object). Every belief, desire etc. has an object that they are about: the believed, the desired. Brentano used the expression "intentional inexistence" to indicate the status of the objects of thought in the mind. The property of being intentional, of having an intentional object, was the key feature to distinguish psychological phenomena and physical phenomena, because, as Brentano defined it, physical phenomena lacked the ability to generate original intentionality, and could only facilitate an intentional relationship in a second-hand manner, which he labeled derived intentionality.
"Every mental phenomenon is characterized by what the Scholastics of the Middle Ages called the intentional (or mental) inexistence of an object, and what we might call, though not wholly unambiguously, reference to a content, direction towards an object (which is not to be understood here as meaning a thing), or immanent objectivity. Every mental phenomenon includes something as object within itself, although they do not all do so in the same way. In presentation something is presented, in judgement something is affirmed or denied, in love loved, in hate hated, in desire desired and so on. This intentional in-existence is characteristic exclusively of mental phenomena. No physical phenomenon exhibits anything like it. We could, therefore, define mental phenomena by saying that they are those phenomena which contain an object intentionally within themselves.")

Aristotle's ethical, logical, and metaphysical works were crucial to the development of his thought in the crucial period of the 1920s. In reading Aristotle, Heidegger increasingly contested the traditional Latin translation and scholastic interpretation of his thought. Particularly important (not least for its influence upon others, both in their interpretation of Aristotle and in rehabilitating a neo-Aristotelian "practical philosophy") was his radical reinterpretation of Book Six of Aristotle's Nicomachean Ethics and several books of the Metaphysics. Both informed the argument of Being and Time. Heidegger's thought is original in being an authentic retrieval of the past, a repetition of the possibilities handed down by the tradition.

The idea of asking about being may be traced back via Aristotle to Parmenides. Heidegger claimed to have revived the question of being, the question having been largely forgotten by the metaphysical tradition extending from Plato to Descartes, a forgetfulness extending to the Age of Enlightenment and then to modern science and technology. In pursuit of the retrieval of this question, Heidegger spent considerable time reflecting on ancient Greek thought, in particular on Plato, Parmenides, Heraclitus, and Anaximander, as well as on the tragic playwright Sophocles.


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July 8th, 2015, 6:09 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
Dilthey / Heidegger's very early project of developing a "hermeneutics of factical life" and his hermeneutical transformation of phenomenology was influenced in part by his reading of the works of Wilhelm Dilthey. Of the influence of Dilthey, Hans-Georg Gadamer writes the following: "As far as Dilthey is concerned, we all know today what I have known for a long time: namely that it is a mistake to conclude on the basis of the citation in Being and Time that Dilthey was especially influential in the development of Heidegger's thinking in the mid-1920s. This dating of the influence is much too late." He adds that by the fall of 1923 it was plain that Heidegger felt "the clear superiority of Count Yorck over the famous scholar, Dilthey." Gadamer nevertheless makes clear that Dilthey's influence was important in helping the youthful Heidegger "in distancing himself from the systematic ideal of Neo-Kantianism, as Heidegger acknowledges in Being and Time." Based on Heidegger's earliest lecture courses, in which Heidegger already engages Dilthey's thought prior to the period Gadamer mentions as "too late", scholars as diverse as Theodore Kisiel and David Farrell Krell have argued for the importance of Diltheyan concepts and strategies in the formation of Heidegger's thought.

Even though Gadamer's interpretation of Heidegger has been questioned, there is little doubt that Heidegger seized upon Dilthey's concept of hermeneutics. Heidegger's novel ideas about ontology required a gestalt formation, not merely a series of logical arguments, in order to demonstrate his fundamentally new paradigm of thinking, and the hermeneutic circle offered a new and powerful tool for the articulation and realization of these ideas.


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July 8th, 2015, 6:10 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
Husserl / There is disagreement over the degree of influence that Husserl had on Heidegger's philosophical development, just as there is disagreement about the degree to which Heidegger's philosophy is grounded in phenomenology. These disagreements centre upon how much of Husserlian phenomenology is contested by Heidegger, and how much this phenomenology in fact informs Heidegger's own understanding. On the relation between the two figures, Gadamer wrote: "When asked about phenomenology, Husserl was quite right to answer as he used to in the period directly after World War I: 'Phenomenology, that is me and Heidegger'." Nevertheless, Gadamer noted that Heidegger was no patient collaborator with Husserl, and that Heidegger's "rash ascent to the top, the incomparable fascination he aroused, and his stormy temperament surely must have made Husserl, the patient one, as suspicious of Heidegger as he always had been of Max Scheler's volcanic fire."

Robert J. Dostal understood the importance of Husserl to be profound: "Heidegger himself, who is supposed to have broken with Husserl, bases his hermeneutics on an account of time that not only parallels Husserl's account in many ways but seems to have been arrived at through the same phenomenological method as was used by Husserl.... The differences between Husserl and Heidegger are significant, but if we do not see how much it is the case that Husserlian phenomenology provides the framework for Heidegger's approach, we will not be able to appreciate the exact nature of Heidegger's project in Being and Time or why he left it unfinished."

Daniel O. Dahlstrom saw Heidegger's presentation of his work as a departure from Husserl as unfairly misrepresenting Husserl's own work. Dahlstrom concluded his consideration of the relation between Heidegger and Husserl as follows: "Heidegger's silence about the stark similarities between his account of temporality and Husserl's investigation of internal time-consciousness contributes to a misrepresentation of Husserl's account of intentionality. Contrary to the criticisms Heidegger advances in his lectures, intentionality (and, by implication, the meaning of 'to be') in the final analysis is not construed by Husserl as sheer presence (be it the presence of a fact or object, act or event). Yet for all its "dangerous closeness" to what Heidegger understands by temporality, Husserl's account of internal time-consciousness does differ fundamentally. In Husserl's account the structure of protentions is accorded neither the finitude nor the primacy that Heidegger claims are central to the original future of ecstatic-horizonal temporality."


July 8th, 2015, 6:13 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
Gadamer's philosophical project was to elaborate on the concept of "philosophical hermeneutics", which Heidegger initiated but never dealt with at length. Gadamer's goal was to uncover the nature of human understanding. In Truth and Method, Gadamer argued that "truth" and "method" were at odds with one another. He was critical of two approaches to the human sciences (Geisteswissenschaften). On the one hand, he was critical of modern approaches to humanities that modeled themselves on the natural sciences, which simply sought to “objectively” observe and analyze texts and art. On the other hand, he took issue with the traditional German approaches to the humanities, represented for instance by Friedrich Schleiermacher and Wilhelm Dilthey, who believed that meaning, as an object, could be found within a text through a particular process that allowed for a connection with the author’s thoughts that led to the creation of a text (Schleiermacher), or the situation that led to an expression of human inner life (Dilthey). Instead, Gadamer argued meaning and understanding are not objects to be found through certain methods, but are inevitable phenomena. Hermeneutics is not a process in which an interpreter finds a particular meaning, but “a philosophical effort to account for understanding as an ontological—the ontological—process of man.” Thus, Gadamer is not giving a prescriptive method on how to understand, but rather he is working to examine how understanding, whether of texts, artwork, or experience, is possible at all. Gadamer intended Truth and Method to be a description of what we always do when we interpret things (even if we do not know it): "My real concern was and is philosophic: not what we do or what we ought to do, but what happens to us over and above our wanting and doing".

As a result of Martin Heidegger’s temporal analysis of human existence, Gadamer argued that people have a "historically-effected" consciousness (wirkungsgeschichtliches Bewußtsein), and that they are embedded in the particular history and culture that shaped them. However the historical consciousness is not an object over and against our existence, but “a stream in which we move and participate, in every act of understanding.” Therefore, people do not come to any given thing without some form of preunderstanding established by this historical stream. The tradition in which an interpreter stands establishes "prejudices" that affect how he or she will make interpretations. For Gadamer, these prejudices are not something that hinders our ability to make interpretations, but are both integral to the reality of being, and “are the basis of our being able to understand history at all.” [...] Both the text and the interpreter find themselves within a particular historical tradition, or “horizon.” Each horizon is expressed through the medium of language, and both text and interpreter belong to and participate in history and language. This “belongingness” to language is the common ground between interpreter and text that makes understanding possible. As an interpreter seeks to understand a text, a common horizon emerges. This fusion of horizons does not mean the interpreter now fully understands some kind of objective meaning, but is “an event in which a world opens itself to him.” [...] Gadamer uses Plato’s dialogues as a model for how we are to engage with written texts. To be in conversation, one must take seriously “the truth claim of the person with whom one is conversing.” Further, each participant in the conversation relates to one another insofar as they belong to the common goal of understanding one another. "meaning" emerges not as an object that lies in the text or in the interpreter, but rather an event that results from the interaction of the two.

Finally, Gadamer's essay on Celan (entitled "Who Am I and Who Are You?") has been considered by many—including Heidegger and Gadamer himself—as a "second volume" or continuation of the argument in Truth and Method.

http://plato.stanford.edu/entries/gadamer/

http://www.theguardian.com/news/2002/ma ... obituaries


July 29th, 2015, 4:31 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
... dialogue as the connecting link between reader and text, between present and past, and between indigenous and alien culture. Still, notwithstanding their rich insights and achievements, Gadamer's writings up to this point continued to be attached to a certain kind of idealism: that is, an outlook where difference was attenuated in favor of a nearly preestablished harmony between self and other and of an eventual "fusion of horizons" between reader and text. A combination of factors and subsequent experiences contributed to a progressive modification of this outlook: foremost among them, the work of the later Heidegger, the impact of French poststructuralism, and exposure to the poetry of Paul Celan. Without in any way trying to rank order these factors or to privilege one over the other, I shall start with the latter experience. In the decade following Truth and Method, Gadamer turned repeatedly to a reading of Celan's poetry, offering lectures and writing papers
on the topic. His comments were finally collected in a volume titled Wer bin Ich und wer bist Du? (published in 1973). This slender volume offers a probing commentary on Celan's poetic cycle, "Crystal of Breath" [Atemkristall]. The accentuated sense of difference and radical otherness is immediately evident in the Preface preceding the commentary. As Gadamer notes, "Paul Celan's poems reach us-and we miss their point [wir verfehlen sie]." This failure or rupture of communication is by no means haphazard; after all, it was Celan himself who described his poetry as a "message in the bottle" [Flaschenpost]-leaving it entirely up to the reader to decode the meaning of the message and to determine even whether the bottle contains any message at all. In his Preface, Gadamer describes himself simply as a recipient of Celan's bottle, and his commentary as "decoding efforts" seeking to decipher "nearly illegible signs."
Approaching such bottled or encoded signs, he observes, requires sustained patience, diligence, and attentiveness to the emphatic difference or otherness of the text. Poems locked into a bottle cannot possibly be expected to yield complete transparency or to be amenable to logical resolution. Still, recognition of difference is not equivalent to a counsel of despair. As Gadamer writes, pointing to his own endeavor:
In presenting the outcome of prolonged attentiveness, this reader believes to have detected "sense" in these dark incunables-not always a univocal sense, and surely not always a "complete" (or completely transparent) meaning. In many instances, he has only deciphered some passages and offered vague hunches how the gaps of his understanding (not of the text) could be mended. Whosoever believes to have already "understood" Celan's poems, this person is not my interlocutor and not the addressee of these pages. Such a person does not know what understanding means in this case.3

The "Crystal of Breath" poems discussed in Gadamer's book belong to a larger poetic cycle called "Turning of Breath" [Atemwende]. These allusions to breath and its turning and crystallization offer a clue to the coded message in the bottle: what the reader encounters here is a peculiarly ruptured communication or a communication through non-communication. As Gadamer observes, "In his later poetry, Paul Celan approaches more and more the breathless stillness of silence in the word turned cryptic cipher." To make headway into this kind of poetry, the reader must be ready for a journey into alien terrain-where readiness does not mean a specially erudite preparation but simply a willingness to listen to the "breathless stillness" of the word. In this journey, some clues may be provided by the poet himself-although these must be treated with great caution and circumspection. Poetry is not simply the
expression of the poet's private feelings or a disclosure of his inner selfhood (or ego); hence, pondering the sense of a poem cannot simply be replaced by psychic empathy. These caveats are particularly important in the case of the cryptic or "hermetic" poetry of Celan-despite the latter's repeated invocation of personal pronouns (like "I," '"thou," "we," and "you"). Notwithstanding this resort to indexicals, Gadamer notes, the actual reference of Celan's pronouns remains in every case "profoundly uncertain." Thus, the term "I" frequently employed in the poems does not simply denote the poet's selfhood seen as something distinct from the "selves" of his readers; rather, the term refers to the self in general, to everybody or "every one of us." Yet, even this formulation is still precarious-because the self of everyone can likewise not be stabilized or pinpointed with certainty, given its embroilment with a "thou" or other. As used by Celan, the term "thou" or "you" means, or can mean, anybody: the reader, a friend or neighbor, or perhaps "that closest and most distant thou which is God." According to Gadamer, the precise target of the address "cannot be determined"; in fact, "the thou is an 'I' just as much and as little as the I is a self (or ego)." 4


3. Hans-Georg Gadamer, Wer bin Ich und wer bist Du? Ein Kommentar zu Paul Celans
Gedichtfolge "Atemkristall" (Frankfurt-Main: Suhrkamp, 1973), 7 (translations into English are my own).
4. Ibid., 9-12. Gadamer diminishes the starkness of the ambiguity somewhat by allowing for an occasional specificity of pronouns. Thus, he speaks of the possible substitution of the "reader-ego" for the "poet's ego" and the resulting "determinacy of the meaning of thou." Ibid., 12.


July 29th, 2015, 10:49 pm
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Post Re: Fashion
These comments are exemplified in the first poem of Celan's cycle, which starts immediately with pronouns: "You may readily / Welcome me with snow." Subsequent lines of the poem allude to the lushness of summer days and to the restless pace of a life lived "shoulder to shoulder" with the exuberant growth of nature. It is against the backdrop of
summer's exuberance that the beginning of the poem welcomes the stillness of snow-but it does so with personal pronouns. Who or what is meant by the opening "You" of the poem, Gadamer asks, and responds, "Nothing more specific or determinate than the Other or otherness itself which, after a summer of restless striving, is expected to grant welcome relief." Likewise, the "I" invoked in these lines is not simply the poet's selfhood but any being longing for winter and silence-perhaps even for the withdrawn reticence of death. In Gadamer's words, "What is expressed in these lines is the readiness to accept otherness-whatever it may be." It is important to note that the appeal to winter and snow involves not merely a reference to a change of seasons or an outward cycle of nature; rather, the appeal is manifest in the poem itself, in its subdued brevity and reticent sparseness. To this extent, the lines instantiate poignantly the turning and crystallization of breath. The stillness of the verses is, Gadamer writes,
the same stillness which prevails at the turning of breath, at the near-inaudible moment of the renewed inhalation of breath. For this is what "Atemwende" signifies: the experience of the noiseless, motionless gap between inhaling and exhaling. I would wish to add that Celan connects this turning of breath or this moment of breath
reversal not only with a posture of motionless reticence, but also with that subdued kind of hope which is implicit in every reversal or conversion [Umkehr]
.
This element of latent hope, however, does not in any way detract from the stark sobriety and hermetic non-expressiveness of Celan's poems. This non-expressiveness also undercuts the prospect of semantic transparency based on interpsychic empathy. As Gadamer adds: "The distinction between me and you, between the self of the poet and that of his readers miscarries."
To the question "Who am I and who are you?" Celan's poetry responds "by leaving the question open." Gadamer's comments on the remainder of Celan's poems are richly
nuanced and completely resist summary synopsis in the present context. At the end of his step-by-step exegesis, Gadamer appends an "Epilogue," or postscript, which usefully highlights the most salient points of his commentary. A central point concerns the character of poetic exegesis, especially of cryptically encoded texts like Celan's message in the bottle. According to Gadamer, the interpreter in this case has to proceed in a diligent but cautious manner, avoiding the temptations of both complete
appropriation and renunciation. Since Celan's verses hover precariously between speech and silence, disclosure and concealment, exegesis likewise has to steer a middle course between understanding and non-understanding, by offering a careful account which yet leaves blank spaces intact. For Gadamer, the endeavor of understanding cannot simply be abandoned, notwithstanding the poet's reticence. As he notes, it is not sufficient merely to register the failure or rupture of understanding;
rather, what is needed is an attempt to look for possible points of entry and then to inquire in which manner and how far understanding may be able to penetrate. The goal of this interpretive endeavor, however, should not be mistaken: the point is not to render transparent what is (and must remain) concealed, but rather to comprehend and respect the complex interlacing of transparency and non-transparency in poetic
texts. In the words of the Epilogue:
The objective is not to discern or pinpoint the univocity of the poet's intent; not by any means. Nor is it a matter of determining the univocity of the "meaning" expressed in the poem itself. Rather what is involved is attentiveness to the ambiguity, multivocity and indeterminacy unleashed by the poetic text-a multivocity which
does not furnish a blank check to the license of the reader, but rather constitutes the very target of the hermeneutical struggle demanded by the text
.6

In its stress on interpretive perseverance, Gadamer's postscript reflects something like a generic disposition or a "good will" to understanding, that is, a disinclination to let rupture or estrangement have the last word. Instead of celebrating the incommensurability of "language games" or "phrase families" (to borrow terms coined by Wittgenstein and Lyotard), Gadamer's account accentuates the open-endedness and at least partial interpenetration of languages and discourses. In lieu of a radical segregation of texts and readers, his hermeneutics tends to underscore their
embeddedness in a common world-although this world
is not so much a "universe" as a "pluriverse" or a multifaceted fabric of heterogeneous elements. Above all, the postscript does not grant to poets the refuge of a total exile. Such an exile, in Gadamer's view, would transform the poet's text into the object of an esoteric cult or of academic expertise. For these and other reasons, he considers "sound" the general maxim that poetry should be treated not as a "learned cryptogram for experts" but rather as a text destined for the "members of a language community sharing a common world," a world inhabitated by "poets and readers and listeners alike." Operating in such a multifaceted context, "understanding" [Verstehen] cannot mean a process of psychic empathy nor a direct grasp of subjective intentionality; given the diversity of outlooks and idioms, exegesis is bound to exhibit the character of struggle, proceeding along the pathway not so much of a preestablished consensus but of something like
an "agonistic dialogue."

6. Ibid., 110. These comments do not prevent Gadamer from observing at another point that the multivocity or "polyvalence" of words is pinpointed or "stabilized in the course of discourse" andthat hence there is "a univocity which is necessarily endemic to every type of discourse, even that of poisie pure." Ibid., 113.


July 29th, 2015, 11:04 pm
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